Standard

Objective

Indicator

Sci-ber Text page

Life Skill

I. Students will understand the scientific evidence that supports theories that explain how the universe and solar system developed. 1. Describe the big bang theory and evidence supporting it. a. Determine the motion of a star relative to Earth based on a red or blue shift in the wavelength of light from the star. Star Colors Thinking & Reasoning: Skills Student uses a variety of strategies and evidence to construct an argument and to defend a position.
b. Explain how evidence of red and blue shifts is used to determine whether the universe is expanding or contracting. I'm Expanding! Systems Thinking: Knowledge Student understands the structure and function of a particular system.
c. Describe the big bang theory and the red shift evidence that supports this theory. What is the Big Bang? Thinking & Reasoning: Skills Student uses inquiry to ask questions and solve problems.
d. Investigate and report how science has changed the accepted ideas regarding the nature of the universe throughout history. So ... What do you think now? Social & Civic Responsibility: Knowledge Student understands the history, people, and traditions that have shaped local communities,
e. Provide an example of how technology has helped scientists investigate the universe. Technology moves science forward. Thinking & Reasoning: Skills Student uses inquiry to ask questions and solve problems.
2. Relate the structure and composition of the solar system to the processes that exist in the universe. a. Compare the elements formed in the big bang (hydrogen, helium) with elements formed through nuclear fusion in stars. Nuclear Fusion Makes Elements Form Thinking & Reasoning: Knowledge Student understands the process of accessing background knowledge when organizing information.
b. Relate the life cycle of stars of various masses to the relative mass of elements produced. Creating Elements Thinking & Reasoning: Knowledge Student possesses a sufficient body of knowledge to inform thinking and reasoning.
c. Explain the origin of the heavy elements on Earth (i.e., heavy elements were formed by fusion in ancient stars). Where did they come from? Thinking & Reasoning: Skills Student uses a variety of strategies and evidence to construct an argument and to defend a position.
d. Present evidence that the process that formed Earth’s heavy elements continues in stars today. Stars still make them! Systems Thinking: SkillsStudent understands how various systems work.
e. Compare the life cycle of the sun to the life cycle of other stars. How are stars related? Thinking & Reasoning: Skills Student uses a variety of strategies and evidence to construct an argument and to defend a position.
f. Relate the structure of the solar system to the forces acting upon it. Can You Throw a Football to Pluto? Thinking & Reasoning: Skills Student uses inquiry to ask questions and solve problems.
Science Language Students Should Know And Use
 
II. Students will understand that the features of Earth’s evolving environment affect living systems, and that life on Earth is unique in the solar system. 1. Describe the unique physical features of Earth’s environment that make life on Earth possible. a. Compare Earth’s atmosphere, solar energy, and water to those of other planets and moons in the solar system. How's The Air Out There? Thinking and Reasoning:
Knowledge Understands the process of accessing background knowledge when organizing information.
b. Compare the conditions that currently support life on Earth to the conditions that exist on other planets in the solar system. Let Me Take You There!!! Communication: Skills Writes with clarity and purpose to accurately convey information.
c. Evaluate evidence for existence of life in other star systems, planets, or moons, either now or in the past. Are We Alone? Thinking and Reasoning:
Knowledge Understands that inquiry is characterized by a common set of values that include logical thinking, precision, open-mindedness, objectivity, skepticism, replicability of results, and honest evaluation of information.
2. Analyze how ecosystems differ from each other due to abiotic and biotic factors. a. Observe and list abiotic factors (e.g., temperature, water, nutrients, sunlight, pH, topography) in specific ecosystems. Abiotic Factors ... "Say What Are They?" Systems Thinking:
Knowledge Understands the structure and function of a particular system.
b. Observe and list biotic factors (e.g., plants, animals, organic matter) that affect a specific ecosystem (e.g., wetlands, deserts, aquatic). It's Alive! Systems Thinking:
Knowledge Understands the structure and function of a particular system.
c. Predict how an ecosystem will change as a result of major changes in an abiotic and/or biotic factor. Changing Ecosystems Systems Thinking:
Knowledge Understands the existence and interrelationships among differing systems.
d. Explain that energy enters the vast majority of Earth's ecosystems through photosynthesis, and compare the path of energy through two different ecosystems. Ecosystem Energy Thinking and Reasoning:
Knowledge Understands the process of accessing background knowledge when organizing information.
e. Analyze interactions within an ecosystem (e.g., water temperature and fish species, weathering and water pH). Ecosystems At Risk Thinking and Reasoning:
Knowledge Understands the process of accessing background knowledge when organizing information.
f. Plan and conduct an experiment to investigate how abiotic factors influence organisms and how organisms influence the physical environment. The Ecosystem Experiment! Thinking and Reasoning:
Knowledge Understands that inquiry is characterized by a common set of values that include logical thinking, precision, open-mindedness, objectivity, skepticism, replicability of results, and honest evaluation of information.
3. Examine Earth's diversity of life as it changes over time. a. Observe and chart the diversity in a specific area. Comparing Biological Diversity Thinking and Reasoning:
Knowledge Possesses a sufficient body of knowledge to inform thinking and reasoning.
b. Compare the diversity of life in various biomes specific to number of species, biomass, and type of organisms. Earth's Biomes Systems Thinking:
Skills articulates the components of diverse systems
Compares and contrasts systems in order to be able to function within them.
c. Explain factors that contribute to the extinction of a species. To Live Or Die? ... That Is The Question. Thinking and Reasoning:
Knowledge Understands that inquiry is characterized by a common set of values that include logical thinking, precision, open-mindedness, objectivity, skepticism, replicablity of results, and honest evaluation of information.
d. Compare evidence supporting various theories that explain the causes of large-scale extinctions in the past with factors causing the loss of species today. Extinction Thinking and Reasoning:
Knowledge
Understands that inquiry is characterized by a common set of values that include logical thinking, precision, open-mindedness, objectivity, skepticism, replicablity of results, and honest evaluation of information.
e. Evaluate the biological, esthetic, ethical, social, or economic arguments with regard to maintaining biodiversity. Biodiversity: What do you think? Systems Thinking: Knowledge
Understands the existence and interrelationships among differing systems.
Science Language Students Should Know And Use
 
III. Students will understand that gravity, density, and convection move Earth’s plates and this movement causes the plates to impact other Earth systems. 1. Explain the evidence that supports the theory of plate tectonics. a. Define and describe the location of the major plates and plate boundaries. Where, O Where Did My Boundary Go? Thinking & Reasoning: Knowledge Possesses a sufficient body of knowledge to inform thinking and reasoning. Compares and contrasts specific abstract or concrete attributes.
b. Compare the movement and results of movement along convergent, divergent, and transform plate boundaries. We All Have Boundaries Thinking & Reasoning: Knowledge Possesses a sufficient body of knowledge to inform thinking and reasoning. Compares and contrasts specific abstract or concrete attributes.
c. Relate the location of Earthquakes and volcanoes to plate boundaries. Where It's At Thinking & Reasoning: Knowledge Possesses a sufficient body of knowledge to inform thinking and reasoning. Compares and contrasts specific abstract or concrete attributes.
d. Explain Alfred Wegener’s continental drift hypothesis, his evidence, and why it was not accepted in his time. It's All Very Puzzling! Social & Civic Responsibility: Knowledge Understand the history, people, and traditions that have shaped local communities, nations, and the world. Analyzes diverse viewpoints of social and civic issues in local, regional and global events.
e. Evaluate the evidence for the current theory of plate tectonics. A Lot On My Plate. Thinking & Reasoning: Knowledge Possesses a sufficient body of knowledge to inform thinking and reasoning. Compares and contrasts specific abstract or concrete attributes.
2. Describe the processes within Earth that result in plate motion and relate it to changes in other Earth systems. a. Identify the energy sources that cause material to move within Earth. Get A Move On! System Thinking: Knowledge Understands the structure and function of a particular system. Compares and contrasts systems in order to be able to function within them.
b. Model the movement of materials within Earth. Round And Round We Go! Thinking & Reasoning: Knowledge Possesses a sufficient body of knowledge to inform thinking and reasoning. Compares and contrasts specific abstract or concrete attributes.
c. Model the movement and interaction of plates. Ready, Set, Glue Thinking & Reasoning: Knowledge Possesses a sufficient body of knowledge to inform thinking and reasoning. Compares and contrasts specific abstract or concrete attributes.
d. Relate the movement and interaction of plates to volcanic eruptions, mountain building, and climate changes. Cause and Effect System Thinking: Knowledge Understands the structure and function of a particular system. Compares and contrasts systems in order to be able to function within them.
e. Predict the effects of plate movement on other Earth systems (e.g., volcanic eruptions affect weather, mountain building diverts waterways, uplift changes elevation that alters plant and animal diversity, upwelling from ocean vents results in changes in biomass). Look Into The Crystal Ball Thinking & Reasoning: Knowledge Possesses a sufficient body of knowledge to inform thinking and reasoning. Compares and contrasts specific abstract or concrete attributes.
Science Language Students Should Know And Use
 
IV. Students will understand that water cycles through and between reservoirs in the hydrosphere and affects the other spheres of the Earth system. 1. Explain the water cycle in terms of its reservoirs, the movement between reservoirs, and the energy to move water. Evaluate the importance of freshwater to the biosphere. a. Identify the reservoirs of Earth’s water cycle (e.g., ocean, ice caps/glaciers, atmosphere, lakes, rivers, biosphere, groundwater) locally and globally, and graph or chart relative amounts in global reservoirs. Storing Water. Communication: Knowledge Knows how to convey information verbally and in written form.
b. Illustrate the movement of water on Earth and describe how the processes that move water (e.g., evaporation of water, melting of ice/snow, ocean currents, movement of water vapor by wind) use energy from the sun. Let The Cycle Begin Thinking and Reasoning: Knowledge Possesses a sufficient body of knowledge to inform thinking and reasoning.
c. Relate the physical and chemical properties of water to a water pollution issue. Water Can Be Dirty! Social and Civic Responsibility: Skill Gathers and analyzes information on global and environmental issues and, with others, takes responsible action.
d. Make inferences about the quality and/or quantity of freshwater, using data collected from local water systems. Keeping Water Safe To Drink. Thinking and Reasoning: Knowledge Understands the process of accessing background knowledge when organizing information.
e. Analyze how communities deal with water shortages, distribution, and quality in designing a long-term water use plan. How Do You Fix A Drought? Social and Civic Responsibility: Skills Gathers and analyzes information on global and environmental issues and, with others, takes responsible action.
2. Analyze the physical and biological dynamics of the oceans. a. Describe the physical dynamics of the oceans (e.g., wave action, ocean currents, El Nino, tides). The Living Oceans Systems Thinking: Knowledge Understands the existence and interrelationships among differing systems.
b. Determine how physical properties of oceans affect organisms (e.g., salinity, depth, tides, temperature). Life In The Ocean Thinking and Reasoning: Knowledge possesses a sufficient body of knowledge to inform thinking and reasoning.
c. Model energy flow in ocean ecosystems. Ocean Energy Flow Thinking and Reasoning: Knowledge Understands the process of accessing background knowledge when organizing information.
d. Research and report on changing ocean levels over geologic time, and relate changes in ocean level to changes in the water cycle. Changing Ocean Water Levels Thinking and Reasoning: Knowledge possesses a sufficient body of knowledge to inform thinking and reasoning.
e. Describe how changing sea levels could affect life on Earth. Sea Levels Affecting Mankind? Thinking and Reasoning: Knowledge possesses a sufficient body of knowledge to inform thinking and reasoning.
Science Language Students Should Know And Use
 
V. Students will understand that Earth's atmosphere interacts with and is altered by the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere. 1. Describe how matter in the atmosphere cycles through other Earth systems. a. Trace movement of a carbon atom from the atmosphere through a plant, animal, and decomposer, and back into the atmosphere. Carbon? ... Who Needs Carbon? Thinking and Reasoning: Knowledge Possesses a sufficient body of knowledge to inform thinking and reasoning.
b. Diagram the nitrogen cycle and provide examples of human actions that affect this cycle (e.g., fertilizers, crop rotation, fossil fuel combustion). The Nitrogen Cycle Thinking and Reasoning: Knowledge Possesses a sufficient body of knowledge to inform thinking and reasoning.
c. Interpret evidence suggesting that humans are influencing the carbon cycle. Have Humans Changed The Carbon Cycle? Thinking and Reasoning: Skills Uses various reading and writing strategies to organize, interpret, analyze and comprehend information.
d. Research ways the biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere interact with the atmosphere (e.g., volcanic eruptions putting ash and gases into the atmosphere, hurricanes, changes in vegetation). How Do Interactions Change Weather? Thinking and Reasoning: Skills Uses various reading and writing strategies to organize, interpret, analyze, and comprehend information.
2. Trace ways in which the atmosphere has been altered by living systems and has itself strongly affected living systems over the course of Earth’s history. a. Define ozone and compare its effects in the lower and upper atmosphere. In The O-Zone Thinking and Reasoning: Skills Uses various reading and writing strategies to organize, interpret, analyze, and comprehend information.
b. Describe the role of living organisms in producing the ozone layer and how the ozone layer affected the development of life on Earth. Which Came First??? Thinking and Reasoning: Skills Uses various reading and writing strategies to organize, interpret, analyze, and comprehend information.
c. Compare the rate at which CO2 is put into the atmosphere to the rate at which it is removed through the carbon cycle. Ch... Ch... Changes! Thinking and Reasoning: Skills Uses various reading and writing strategies to organize, interpret, analyze, and comprehend information.
d. Analyze data relating to the concentration of atmospheric CO2 over the past 100 years. What Does It Mean? Thinking and Reasoning: Skills Compares and contrasts specific abstract or concrete attributes.
e. Research, evaluate, and report on international efforts to protect the atmosphere. Where Do I Look? Thinking and Reasoning: Skills uses a variety of strategies and evidence to construct an argument and to defend a position.
Science Language Students Should Know And Use
 
VI. Students will understand the source and distribution of energy on Earth and its effects on Earth systems. 1. Describe the transformation of solar energy into heat and chemical energy on Earth and eventually the radiation of energy to space. a. Illustrate the distribution of energy coming from the sun that is reflected, changed into heat, or stored by plants. You Are My Sunshine! Systems Thinking: Skills Articulates the components of diverse systems.
b. Describe the pathways for converting and storing light energy as chemical energy (e.g., light energy converted to chemical energy stored in plants, plants become fossil fuel).
How Enlightening
Aesthetics: Knowledge Understands that aesthetic elements are found in the arts, humanities, sciences and the natural world.
c. Investigate the conversion of light energy from the sun into heat energy by various Earth materials. Converting Solar Energy To Heat Energy Employability: Skills Identifies personal interests, abilities and qualities of character that lead to a career path.
d. Demonstrate how absorbed solar energy eventually leaves the Earth system as heat radiating to space. How Do You Store Heat Energy? Systems Thinking: Knowledge Understands the structure and function of a particular system.
e. Construct a model that demonstrates the reduction of heat loss due to a greenhouse effect. Modeling The Greenhouse Effect Thinking and Reasoning: Skills Uses a variety of strategies and evidence to constrict an argument and to defend a position.
f. Research global changes and relate them to Earth systems (e.g., global warming, solar fluctuations). Change Is Happening! Social and Civic Responsibility: Skills Gathers and analyzes information on global and environmental issues and with others, takes responsible action.
2. Relate energy and transformation to the effects on Earth systems. a. Describe the difference between climate and weather, and how technology is used to monitor changes in each. Oh, Yeah...How Are You Going Prove It? Thinking and Reasoning: Knowledge Possess a sufficient body of knowledge to inform(ed) thinking and reasoning.
b. Describe the effect of solar energy on the determination of climate and weather (e.g., El Nino, solar intensity). Hit Me When Its Hot! Thinking and Reasoning: Knowledge Knows and understands principles of logic and reasoning.
c. Explain how uneven heating at the equator and polar regions creates atmospheric and oceanic convection currents that move heat energy around Earth. What Causes Global Wind Patterns? Thinking and Reasoning: Knowledge Understands that inquiry is characterized by a common set of values that include logical thinking, precision, open-mindedness, objectivity, skepticism, replicability of results, and honest evaluation of information.
d. Describe the Coriolis effect and its role in global wind and ocean current patterns. How Does Earth's Spinning Affect Wind And Ocean Patterns? Thinking and Reasoning: Skills Compares and contrasts specific abstract or concrete attributes.
e. Relate how weather patterns are the result of interactions among ocean currents, air currents, and topography. The Weather's A-Changin' Systems Thinking: Knowledge Understands the existence and interrelationships among differing systems.
Science Language Students Should Know And Use