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Kinds of Energy

Energy is the ability to cause change!  Any type of activity will require some type of energy. Energy is either used, or given off, during a physical or chemical change.

Heat, sound, light, motion, chemical, electrical, and radiation, are all examples of types of energy. Most of the energy found on Earth is due to the influence of our sun.

Image courtesy of SOHO
 
Energy is always in flux. It is always changing from one form to another. This is an  important law of nature called the "Law of Conservation of Energy". It has often been said you cannot create nor destroy energy.
 

Identify what kind of energy is given off for each of the following by clicking the button next to the answer of your choice.

1. Using a saw to cut a piece of wood in half.
Heat
Sound
Light
Heat and Light
Heat and Sound
Heat, Light, and Sound
2. The explosion of a firecracker.
Heat
Sound
Light
Heat and Light
Heat and Sound
Heat, Light, and Sound
3. Melting of an ice cube.
Heat
Sound
Light
Heat and Light
Heat and Sound
Heat, Light, and Sound
4. The glow of a fluorescent light.
Heat
Sound
Light
Heat and Light
Heat and Sound
Heat, Light, and Sound
5. Boiling water on a stove.
Heat
Sound
Light
Heat and Light
Heat and Sound
Heat, Light, and Sound
6. Dropping a glass beaker onto the floor.
Heat
Sound
Light
Heat and Light
Heat and Sound
Heat, Light, and Sound
 
Try It!
Now, you demonstrate the relationship between changes and energy.
 

Materials:

  • 500 ml. beaker
  • Thermometer
  • Ice
  • Salt
  • Balance scale
  • Spoon
  • Clock, watch, or stopwatch
 
Safety concerns: icon Be sure to keep allglassware, and chemical safety rules. As with all science lab activities, the most important safety rule is to follow all teacher directions.
 

Procedure:

  1. Place the thermometer into the beaker.
  2. Fill the beaker half full of ice.
  3. Use the thermometer to measure the ice temperature (make sure you wait until the temperature is stable.)
  4. Measure 25 grams of salt and use the spoon to stir it into the ice.
  5. Observe and record the temperature every minute. Stir the ice/salt mixture between temperature readings.
  6. Continue your experiment for 15 minutes.
 

Sample Data Table:

Ice temperature  
Temperature of ice/salt mixture at beginning:  
Temperature of ice/salt mixture each minute
1  
2  
3  
4  
5  
6  
7  
8  
9  
10  
11  
12  
13  
14  
15  
 

Analysis:

  1. What kind of energy did you demonstrate was involved in this experiment?
  2. What purpose did the salt have in the experiment?
  3. How could you modify this experiment to change the results?
  4. What evidence do you have that a change happened?
  5. Graph the data with time along one axis and temperature on the other.

Review Science safetey rules here.

Get the plug-ins: Get Adobe Acrobat Reader , and Get Quicktime Player. (The QuickTime plug-in is needed to play sounds and movies correctly.)

Want to share photos of you or your friends doing this activity? Send it in an e-mail with the following information:

  1. The title of the activity
  2. The URL (Internet address)
  3. Your name.

Remember that no pictures can be used that show student faces or student names on it. 

Teachers should view the Teacher Site Map to relate Sci-ber text and the USOE 8th grade science core.


Updated October 24, 2008 by: Glen Westbroek

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