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The Rock Cycle is a natural process that illustrates how rocks change from one form to another. The process generally takes a long time. There can be quick changes such as those that are observed at a volcano but often these changes will not be observed because they happen so slowly.

 

Remember from the last lesson that there are three rock types, sedimentary, metamorphic and igneous. We use the rock cycle to help us visualize all of the changes that the earth’s materials go through. Rocks go through various processes and change from one form to another.

When a rock undergoes melting and cooling, it becomes an igneous rock. If a rock goes through the processes of weathering, erosion, deposition and cementation it becomes a sedimentary rock. Metamorphic rocks form when a rock goes through intense heat and pressure without melting. For a review on how each rock is formed click on this “Rock Types” link.

 

Check your knowlege.

  1. Closely observe the photograph of the rock in the first column.
  2. Read what happens to the rock in the second column.
  3. Drag your mouse over the answer explaining what the rock will become (do not click).

Ready to try??? Go for it!

The rock shown in the photograph below
Goes through To become what type of rock?
1

Sedimentary

Metamorphic

Igneous

2

Sedimentary

Metamorphic

Igneous

3

Sedimentary

Metamorphic

Igneous

4

Sedimentary

Metamorphic

Igneous

5

Sedimentary

Metamorphic

Igneous

 
Visit Pioneer Library and search e-Media for the video "Geologists Notebook: Three Rocks."
 

Based on what you have learned about the differences between rocks, fill in the following chart showing the rock cycle stages. You might find the above images above to be helpful in completing the blanks. Check your answers by dragging your mouse over the image!

Review Science safetey rules here.

Get the plug-ins: Get Adobe Acrobat Reader , and Get Quicktime Player. (The QuickTime plug-in is needed to play sounds and movies correctly.)

Want to share photos of you or your friends doing this activity? Send it in an e-mail with the following information:

  1. The title of the activity
  2. The URL (Internet address)
  3. Your name.

Remember that no pictures can be used that show student faces or student names on it. 

Teachers should view the Teacher Site Map to relate Sci-ber text and the USOE 8th grade science core.


Updated October 24, 2008 by: Glen Westbroek

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