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Are We Related?

Journal Entry - Take out your science journal and answer the following question(s) (use drawings as appropriate):
What is the relationship between the angle at which light from the sun strikes Earth, the length of daylight hours, and the amount of energy Earth receives ?

 
Look closely at each of the following diagrams that illustrate the sun's path in the sky compared to Earth. For each diagram, determine the angle of the sun rays, the number of daylight hours, and the amount of energy.
 
Angle of sun rays
Direct (straight)
Slant (slight)
Slant (significant)
Amount of daylight hours.
More
Middle
Less
Amount of energy
High
Medium
Low
 
Angle of sun rays
Direct (straight)
Slant (slight)
Slant (significant)
Amount of daylight hours.
More
Middle
Less
Amount of energy
High
Medium
Low
 
Angle of sun rays
Direct (straight)
Slant (slight)
Slant (significant)
Amount of daylight hours.
More
Middle
Less
Amount of energy
High
Medium
Low
 
Angle of sun rays
Direct (straight)
Slant (slight)
Slant (significant)

Amount of daylight hours.
More
Middle
Less

Amount of energy
High
Medium
Low

 
Extension Activity:
 
Your goal is to determine how Earth's tilt is related to the difference in light strength.
 

Materials:

  • Globe
  • Masking tape
  • Pen or pencil
  • Bright flashlight or single bulb lamp
 

Procedure:

  1. Start by numbering the tape from one to twenty-four. Leave space between each number so you can tear the tape apart.
  2. Place one piece of tape on each of the longitude lines (going from north to south) which intersect with the latitude line that goes through the United States near Utah.
  3. Have a friend hold the light back so it shines on most of the globe.
  4. The light represents the sun.
  5. Tilt the globe so the North Pole is facing the light. Each number represents a one-hour division on the earth. Slowly turn the globe and see how many of the numbers can be seen at the same time.
  6. Record your observations in your science journal.
  7. Now tilt the globe so the North Pole is facing away from the light. Slowly turn the globe and see how many numbers can be seen at the same time. Record your observations in your science journal.
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Earths_moon_image

seasons_image

solar_system_image size_motion_distance_image microorganism_image Heat_light_and_sound_image

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Teachers should view the Teacher Site Map to relate Sci-ber text and the USOE 6th grade science core.


Updated October 24, 2008 by: Glen Westbroek

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